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Monday 24th of April 2017    

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Track A: Theoretical Foundations of mBusiness

Track B: Mobile Value Services and Business Models

Track C: Strategies, Policies and Economics of mBusiness

Track D: Mobile Entertainment

Track E: Mobile Government

Track F: Contextual and Pervasive Systems

Track G: Social Networking and Societal Implications of mBusiness 

Track H: Mobile Marketing and Advertising

Track I: Mobile User Behavior

Track J: Innovation Networks in mBusiness

Track K: Enterprise Applications/Mobility

Track L: Industry Track 

 

 

Track A: Theoretical Foundations of mBusiness

Eusebio Scornavacca, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Jonathan Wareham, ESADE Business School, Spain 

Mobile Business is a very young research field, and theory concerning information systems mobility has lagged behind the actual phenomenon. The development of theoretical foundations that capture the peculiar nature of mobile business still is one of the greatest challenges for mobile business researchers. This track welcomes contributions that promote the formulation of theoretical constructs and models in the field of mobile business. At the same time, the track welcomes contributions oriented towards theory development that evince the applicability of various research methods (either interpretive- or positivist-based) to investigate mobile business related phenomena.



Track B: Mobile Value Services and Business Models

Christer Carlsson, Abo Akademi University, Finland

Jan Marco Leimeister, Universität Kassel, Germany 

The spread of computing applications, software and increasing processor power in the physical world makes available a growing amount of computational resources to end users. As a result, Information technology artefacts are embedded in more places than just our desktop computers providing innovative services to organizations, groups, or individuals. This research track will welcome both theoretical and practical contributions that will discuss innovative mobile, wireless, and pervasive applications and services (e.g. mobile government, mobile healthcare, telematics, education, etc). Moreover, the design and development of applications for mobile and pervasive systems presents several challenges for developers compared to their desktop-based counterparts. For example, the characteristics of the access device vary in terms of shape, processing power, and shape. Moreover, interaction is fundamentally different requiring developers to devise new interaction modalities with the end-system. This track will also address topics pertaining the design, implementation, deployment, and evaluation of architectures, middleware, operating systems, interaction modalities, and applications for computing and communications in mobile and wireless systems.

 

Track C: Strategies, Policies and Economics of mBusiness

Ming-Hui Huang, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Paul Pavlou, Temple University, USA

This track will examine the three integrated aspects of mBusiness: (1) Economic principles that govern mobile market exchanges; (2) Strategies that create a competitive advantage for mobile firms; and (3) public policies that facilitate and regulate market exchange in mobile markets.  

The Economics aspect has a focus on the mobility implications of mobile markets and welcomes research related to applications of economics to markets where mobile technologies play an important role. Specifically, we welcome papers examining technological, institutional, and behavioral economic factors that determine the behavior of actors in mobile marketplaces, such as mobile pricing, mobile auctions, outsourcing and offshoring of mobile technologies, the role of reputation and trust, the information economics of mobile market exchange, the distribution of mobile goods and services, and the evolution of market structures.

The Strategies aspect has a focus on the agility of firms and welcomes contributions on how mobile technologies can help business build strategic advantages by becoming more efficient, effective, and profitable with the use of mobile technologies. Papers submitted to this track should provide implications for managers for the design and implementation of mobile applications for competitive advantage.

The Public Policies aspect focuses on the ubiquitous consequences of mobile technologies and welcomes papers on any policy-related topics that lead to superior market performance, such as competitive entry, setting technological standards, the diffusion of mobile telecommunications services, price regulation, and the conduct of mobile network operators. Papers should have implications for policy makers involved in regulation and competition of mobile technologies and markets.

 

 

 

Track D: Mobile Entertainment

Hans van der Heijden, University of Surrey, UK 

Sirka Javernpaa, University of Texas at Austin, USA

 

Track E: Mobile Government

Elizabeth Fife, University of South California, USA

Jochen Scholl, University of Washington, USA 

Mobilizing the Business of Government can be seen as a direct outgrowth of digitizing the business of government (also known as Digital Government, or e-Government). Under the new mobility paradigm and regardless of the sector (public or private), human actors expect to be able to satisfy their information and electronic transaction needs (combined data/voice) at any time and at any place. For the public sector this shift has numerous and challenging implications, but also holds promises of huge productivity gains and ubiquitous service availability in unprecedented ways. The Mobile Government Track is intended to showcase and discuss current practices, applications, opportunities, and unique challenges in mobile public-sector services, government field force automation, and mobile ICT-enabled disaster and emergency response management among other areas of mobile business in government. The track is also intended to pave the path towards a comprehensive research agenda on mobile government.

 

Track F: Contextual and Pervasive Systems

George Roussos, University of London, UK 

Hannes Werthner, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

Youngjin Yoo, Temple University, USA 

 

Being context-ware will improve how systems adapt to dynamic changes influenced by various factors during operation. Context-aware techniques have been widely applied in different types of  applications, but still are limited to small scale or single-organizational environments due to the lack of well-agreed interfaces, protocols, and models for exchanging context data. Mobile and Web services technologies can support and simplify the exchange of context information in large scale, multi-organizational environments, thus enable such systems to utilize various types of context information to adapt their behaviors and operations to dynamic changes.

However, when systems and applications are built from different systems provided by and hosted in multiple organizations, it is still challenging to make the systems and applications context-aware, as this requires services to be aware of each other and aware of the context of customers and applications. Furthermore, it is challenging to ensure data governance and quality-aspect in handling context information. To address these challenges, solutions for enabling context-awareness must be open and interoperable.

This research track will welcome both theoretical and practical contributions that will discuss above metnioned challenges of innovative mobile, wireless, and pervasive applications and services.

 

Track G: Social Networking and Societal Implications of mBusiness

Claudia Loebbecke, University of Cologne, Germany

Keng Siau, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, USA

The mobile revolution is changing both our personal and professional lives,and is altering the way businesses and consumers behave and interact with each other.  Mobile device users can create their own profiles, make friends, participate in chat rooms, hold private conversations, view photos and videos, and share blogs by using their mobile devices.  The any-time any-place features of mobile devices enhance collective intelligence, collaborative work, and social communities.  This track welcomes behavioral, organizational, and technical research related to mobile social networking, and is open to all types of research methods (e.g., survey, experimentation, case studies, action research, design science, etc.).  

 

Track H: Mobile Marketing and Advertising

Indranil Bose, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Angelika Dimoka, Temple University, USA

Mobile marketing as a branch of mobile commerce refers to marketing activities conducted using mobile technologies. This ranges from advertising of products and services on mobile devices to discounting and promotions using the mobile communication medium. Like other applications of mobile commerce, the emergence and development of mobile marketing is triggered by the ubiquity of mobile devices and the advancement in mobile communication technologies. Mobile marketing is different from other form of marketing activities due to its ability to reach people anywhere, and anytime with timely, location-sensitive and device adaptive advertising and promotions. This track welcomes research that concentrates on designing, managing, and evaluating mobile marketing activities in today’s rapidly changing electronic business environment. Research that examines different types of problems encountered in mobile marketing ranging from strategic or operational decision making to technical issues are welcome.

 

Track I: Mobile User Behavior

Jan Damsgaard, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

Sunanda Sangwan, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

 The mobile phone is the fourth essential item carried by people in addition to their wallet, the watch and keys. The mobile phone has successfully captured a place in our daily life and now we carry it with us everywhere. It has become a multipurpose device that integrates multimedia applications, positioning, and fast Internet connection. There are more than four billion mobile phones in use around the world and soon anyone who wishes to own a mobile phone will be able to acquire one. However we are in the infancy inresearch to understand how the pervasive use of mobile technology influences human behavior. One problem with designing good mobile interfaces and services is in the fact that mobile users and mobility are poorly understood. This track welcomes submissions that map the use of mobile phones with user behavior. The subject matter can focus on individuals or groups' user behavior, or larger social, organizational, and cultural contexts of the user community(ies). Papers on interaction with special mobile services applications or general features of mobile technology are also welcome.
Suggested topics, but not limited to, include the following:

- Profiling, segmentation or structure of user behavior
- Psychological aspects: information retrieval and information processing
of mobile use
- Personal information management
- Utilization of location-based services
- Human factors that shape mobile adoption, acceptance, and interactions
- Social and cultural aspects of mobile usage
- Methodologies of studying mobile usage
- Conceptual frameworks for understanding mobility or mobile use
- The role of personal and ubiquitous technologies in mobile user activities
- Core user tasks in mobile interaction

 

Track J: Innovation Networks in mBusiness

Omar El Sawy, University of Southern California, USA  

Ola Henfridsson, Viktoria Institute, Sweden

It is increasingly recognized that the adoption of new digital technologies and platforms in mobile business triggers the formation of novel forms of innovation networks. Reduced communication costs, online broadband ubiquity, massive amounts of data, and increased modularization are all issues that invite new ways of assembling innovation networks. In digital business ecosystems, not only do enterprises increasingly adopt approaches such as open innovation and end-user innovation to leverage already established relationships --- but, they also establish cross-industry innovation networks in cooperation with enterprises operating in previously unrelated industries.  They are also able to connect to anonymous consumers and professionals around the world. These changes in product and service innovation call for research that investigates the role and nature of innovation networks in mobile business and how they are being formed and can be leveraged. Notable examples of innovation networks in practice include the collaboration between Nike and Apple on the Nike + iPod Sport Kit, Google’s formation of the Open Handset Alliance for developing the Android platform, and the collaboration between TomTom and Opel on “play and go-navigation”, just to name a few.

This track welcomes theoretical, practical, and case-based contributions on innovation networks in mobile business. The track is open to research with different philosophical assumptions (positivist, interpretivist, critical) and different research methods, as well as field cases from practitioners that provide new insights.

 

Track K: Enterprise Applications/Mobility

Rahul Basole, Georgia Institute of Technologe, USA

Mobile information and communication technologies (ICT) play an increasingly important role in today’s enterprises. Enterprise mobility applications can be found in a variety of industry contexts including healthcare, transportation, insurance, travel, supply chain, and professional services. This track welcomes contributions that advance our theoretical and practical understanding of the opportunities and challenges of enterprise mobility. Suggested topics, but not limited to, include the following:

- How does enterprise mobility transform business processes, supply chains, organizations, organizational cultures, etc.?

- What are the organizational, strategic, or technical challenges associated with enterprise mobility adoption, implementation, and use?

- How are enterprise mobility projects planned, implemented, and managed?

- What can enterprise mobility vendors do to facilitate the process?

- How do enterprises manage the consumerization of enterprise mobility?

 

Track L: Industry Track   

George Stefanopoulos, Managing Director, Association of Greek Mobile Network Operators

 
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